Mobile Blogging: A Cutting Edge Phenomenon!





The rise of moblogs

Mobile blogging, the most exciting phenomenon to have swept the blogosphere since the World Wide Web was created in 1999, is one of the reasons so many bloggers are attracted to this activity; in addition to the enjoyment they get from it and the convenience of being able to make frequent updates to keep their visitors up to speed with current trends, issues and other relevant matters. Mobile blogs – also referred to as “moblogs,” – take blogging to a previously unreachable level by allowing users to post events literally as it happen.

This new wave of moblogs via the seemingly non-stop activity of mobloggers, keep web users up to date with matters of importance – both good and bad – as they occur all over the world, thereby helping to make global communication faster and more accurate. Many people feel that the limitations of traditional (text) blogging have a lot to do with geography which – after all – is evidenced by simple physics, since the degree to which a blog could have been made current was directly related to how quickly the blogger returned home and boot up in order to update it; and the limitations were many.

However, similar to how creation of the Web helped to fuel Internet growth to new and astronomical heights post Web/Internet integration, mobile blogging was the beginning of a thrilling new era when web-based communication could occur spontaneously from any location. Moblogging devices meant that there was almost nowhere on the planet which remained off-limits for bloggers once technology caught up with the desire of bloggers to expand their market to a global audience. But there was a time, not very long ago, when such expansion may have seemed unattainable.

Desire outpaced technology

The first moblog technology became available over fifteen years ago, but it is only the past five to six years that mobile web devices were made user-friendly enough to appeal to most consumers. As camera phones and other mobile technology become more popular, an increasing number of bloggers were getting away from their desks and hitting the streets. Moblogging was becoming much more widespread than it was in previous cycles, and mobloggers were quickly attracting a lot of attention from the blogging community.

It is clear today (circa 2016) that moblogs have become a dominant force in the blogosphere, and for all intensive purposes, is expected to maintain such dominance for many years to come. So yes, by all implications moblogs are here to stay, if for no other reason than logistics; because, as indicated earlier, mobile devices make it possible to blog from the actual sites where events are unfolding, which is probably the most compelling reason why mobile blogging had – and still has – so many thrilling and compelling characteristics to have revolutionized the blogosphere.

Moblogs fueling Web growth

Consider for a moment that a moblogger with a camera phone can post blog entries from an auto show, ski event, or even at the foot of a podium during a presidential speech; or even from the stands during those final moments of the world series. These real life instances enable bloggers to experience the same real time thrills that live television coverage provides, but in a more democratic medium. The combination of mobility and individual control that moblogging provides places mobloggers on the cutting edge of modern communications technology, and it is hard to imagine that the number and prestige of moblogs will not continue to grow for decades into the future.

The Documentary Quality of Personal Blogging

Blogs as documentaries

There are plenty of blogs on the Web dealing with a wide variety of topics and vastly diverse functions; but many blogs primarily catalog of the life experiences of their owners; so from this perspective it can be said that personal blogging, when discussed in terms of genre, probably falls more frequently in the category of documentary than any other genre. And even though there are quite a number of blogs that focus on the collection of poetry and other forms of creative writing, the vast majority of personal blogs are most likely to be categorized as documentaries.





When you think about it over the span of many years, making a documentary was meant to be an objective act of reporting the sights and sounds that the filmmaker, writer or photographer encountered. However, in contemporary times there was movement towards embracing that degree of subjectivity inherent in the documentary form. This means that modern documentaries often reflected the distinctive voice and sensibility of their creators, making today’s documentaries to revolve around personality, thereby – more often than not – blurring the lines between documentary and memoir.

Blogs fall somewhere between these two genres, muddying the distinctions even further, an indication that the personal blog, documentary and memoir are now irrevocably intertwined for better or for worse. Although few bloggers think of themselves as making documentaries in any formal sense, every time someone sits down in front of a computer and types up a record of their day, s/he is documenting a personal historical moment. Examples of this kind of blogging are those things we take for granted in our daily lives.

Fascination-driven

Things like the way we use specific modes of transportation, or the kinds of products we buy, which may seem quite fascinating to people who live outside our environments, and are therefore fascinated with our lot is at the heart of many documentary projects. When people think about blogging, documentary is not very likely to be the first description they envision, but a few decades down the road it is very likely that todays blogs will be seen primarily as very subjective documentaries of our era. People of tomorrow will almost certainly look to the blogs of today for insight into our historical moment.

Documentary may not be the aim of most people who spend time posting their thoughts and ideas on the Web; but in some ways, the documentary aspect of blogging is more of a side effect than a primary goal. However, the fact that so many people are interested in publishing these public Web diaries shows that personal blogs are about more than just rumination. The fact that bloggers are so stimulated by, and interested in, sharing their ideas with each other reinforces the idea that personal blogs are – in some ways – documentaries meant for public consumption.

A perspective-based niche

An undeniable truism is that documentaries appeal to people who are curious about alternate ways of life, and many people who regularly read personal blogs written by others are looking for this same kind of new perspective. However, this is not to say that vocations such as poetry and other forms of creative writing are deemed less appealing to blogging audiences worldwide; but rather, that each niche commands the attention of a specific section of the marketplace, with documentaries occupying the single largest share.